University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Political Ecology Group meetings > Ivan Scales presents on 'The future of conservation and environmental management in Madagascar: More than just flagships, forests and furry animals?’

Ivan Scales presents on 'The future of conservation and environmental management in Madagascar: More than just flagships, forests and furry animals?’

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  • UserDr. Ivan Scales, Geography Department, University of Cambridge
  • ClockTuesday 11 March 2014, 13:00-14:00
  • HouseSeminar Room.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Judith Schleicher.

Madagascar is one of the most biologically diverse places on the planet, the result of 160 million years of isolation from the African mainland. More than 80% of species are found nowhere else on Earth. However, this highly diverse flora and fauna is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation and the island has been classified one of the world’s highest conservation priorities. The history of conservation policy and practice over the last 30 years shows that international donors, conservation NGOs and the Malagasy government have not been short of bold solutions – from national environmental actions plans to community resource management initiatives and the tripling of its protected areas. However, the continued loss and fragmentation of habitats; the resurgence of the illegal trade in exotic hardwoods; and the fact that policy has often had serious impacts on local livelihoods suggests that there is still much to be done. There has been a recent flourishing of social science research on conservation and development in Madagascar. This has come from a range of disciplines – anthropology, economics, geography, political science and environmental history. Over the course of the last two years I have edited a book on ‘Conservation and Environmental Management in Madagascar’ (Routledge, 2014). The aim of this paper is to distil the key themes and issues that have emerged from the book, highlighting the lessons from the past and the challenges ahead.

This talk is part of the Political Ecology Group meetings series.

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