University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > CRASSH Humanitas Lectures > The Lyrical in Epic Time: On Modern Chinese Literary Thought

The Lyrical in Epic Time: On Modern Chinese Literary Thought

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

  • UserDavid Der-wei Wang (Edward Henderson Professor in Chinese Literature at Harvard University, Director of CCK Foundation Inter-University Center for Sinological Studies, and Academician, Academia Senica) World_link
  • ClockThursday 15 May 2014, 17:00-18:30
  • HouseMill Lane, Lecture Room 1.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Reni Eddo-Lodge.

This is the second of four public Humanitas events in Chinese Studies by renowned scholar of Chinese Literature David Der-wei Wang.

David Der-wei Wang (Professor in Chinese Literature at Harvard University, Director of CCK Foundation Inter-University Center for Sinological Studies, and Academician, Academia Senica) will give a series of three public lectures on The Chinesesness of Chinese Literature, then participate in a concluding symposium on Wednesday 21 May 2014.

This talk proposes that we rethink the critical paradigm of modern Chinese literature in terms of “literary thought” or wenlun. As opposed to “literary theory” or lilun, which derives its conceptual and rhetorical thrust primarily from Western discourse, Chinese literary thought refers to a group of diverse texts, which in turn belong to distinct genres, occasions, and purposes. It tries to “explain the role literature plays in a civilization and to describe literature and literary works in terms that have resonance in other areas of intellectual and social life.”

The talk introduces the lyrical in epic time as an exemplary case of modern Chinese literary thought. It critiques the conventional wisdom that associates lyrical representation with romantic escapade and sentimental solipsism, calling attention instead to modern writers’ and critics’ reappraisal as well as invention of the “lyrical tradition” of China. In particular, it features the engagements undertaken by intellectuals such as Shen Congwen (1902-1988), Chen Shixiang (1912 -1971) and Jaroslav Průšek (1906-1980) in the mid-twentieth century, a time often regarded as the “epic.” As such, the lyrical in epic time constitutes a significant part of modern lyrical discourse which includes articulations from Heidegger to Benjamin, Adorno, Brooks and de Man.

For further information, see http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25337

This talk is part of the CRASSH Humanitas Lectures series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2022 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity