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The political ecology of a customary conservation practice: understanding processes of translation and hybridisation

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  • UserRiamsara Kuyakanon Knapp, Geography Department, University of Cambridge
  • ClockTuesday 29 April 2014, 13:00-14:00
  • HouseSeminar Room.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Judith Schleicher.

Mountain-closure is a tradition practiced in different regions of Bhutan to propitiate the mountain deity and to safeguard crops. It is believed to have ecological effects, and has been represented as a traditional form of conservation. It effectively functioned as a way to manage resources within a community and between different communities, and is embedded in agricultural and migratory herding cycles. As a social institution it is believed to ensure community wellbeing and effectively maintains rights over natural resources.

In this session I present a thesis chapter-in-progress. After situating the chapter within the body of my thesis, I discuss empirical findings on community mountain-closure practice in Bhutan from a political ecology perspective. I then reflect on elements which emerged from this research process which could be broadly grouped under themes of translation and of ‘hybridising’ knowledges.

This talk is part of the Political Ecology Group meetings series.

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